Linda Grissette | St. Charles Real Estate, St. Peters Real Estate, O’Fallon Real Estate


There's more to lawn care than just cutting, watering, and fertilizing your grass. Even if you do these things correctly, your lawn will still build up compacted soil and lawn thatch (the un-decomposed stems and roots that tend to accumulate near the top of the soil). One of the best ways to address these issues is by aerating your lawn. If you've come here because your grass isn't growing as fully as it could be, you're in the right place. Whether this is your first time aerating or if you want to brush up on the proper technique, read on to learn how, when, and why to aerate your lawn.

What is aerating?

To grow healthily, the roots of your grass need to reach deep into the soil. When too much thatch builds up or your soil becomes too compacted, grass has a hard time taking root. Furthermore it becomes difficult to plant new seed or to get nutrients down to the roots of your grass. One do-it-yourself solution to this problem is aeration. Motorized aeration machines plug clumps of compacted soil and pull them out of your yard, allowing water, seed, and fertilizer to enter the soil to grow new, healthy grass.

When should you aerate your lawn?

The best time for aeration is during or just before peak grass-growing season in the spring. Warm weather and a lot of rain and sunshine all will help your newly aerated lawn grow quickly.

Steps of aeration

Here are the steps you should take for aerating your lawn:
  1. The day before aeration rake your yard and clean up anything that might be in your grass (pet toys, garden hoses, etc.)
  2. Water your yard heavily to make the soil moist. If you own an aerator, you can wait until the day after heavy rainfall. If you're renting one, just make sure the soil is wet enough to soften and plug
  3. Use the aerator on your entire lawn, avoiding things like irrigation systems. Then make a second pass with the aerator
  4. You can leave the excavated plugs on your lawn to dry up and decompose
  5. Once aerated, spread compost or peat moss over the yard to prevent further soil compaction

Aeration tips

There are many myths about lawn aeration. Some people argue that you don't need to plug the soil, but rather just spiking the lawn will suffice. Unfortunately, spiking the lawn won't do much to break down thatch and might even further compact your soil (think walking on your lawn with baseball cleats on). Another myth involving aeration is that leaving grass clippings on your lawn will cause thatch to build up quickly. This is also false. Grass clippings are mostly water and will decompose, adding nitrogen to your soil. This could save you money on having to buy fertilizer often. Another tip that will help you maximize the benefit of aeration is to avoid cutting your grass too short. Grass cut under two inches could be damaged or die. After you aerate, let your grass grow a few inches before cutting it, allowing your grass roots to take firm hold.


They are your friend because they will tell you things that are really wrong with your home that need repairing now, as well as future home maintenance that you will need to do in the future.

Once you get all your reports in, we’ll work together to figure out what you can do yourself and what you should ask the seller to fix before closing.

To learn more about Inspections you can have done, get my FREE Information Sheet “Inspections” by clicking on this link…..fill in form….submit it….watch for email. 


 

Having your home in top showing condition means that when a buyer drives up to your home and then goes inside, they  will think you home looks better than any other home in the same price range.

To learn more, you need my FREE Information Sheet “Getting Your Home Ready to Sell” with the basic information on  making your home look great so your home will sell.  

Get this Information Sheet, click on this link…..fill in form….submit  it….watch for email. 


 

Read this before you buy a home

Learn about the home buying process from start to finish with this FREE e-booklet, “Your Guide to Buying Your Dream Home”.  I created this to help buyers learn before they buy because I believe it helps make the home buying process as stress free as possible.

Sure there can be some stress the book can’t take care of, but my experience will help you overcome them. But there will be no stress about knowing what comes next.

Get this great e-Booklet, click on this link…..fill inform….submit it….watch for email. 


We've all heard of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. It has been ominously dubbed "the silent killer" because of its colorless, odorless, tasteless, and non-irritating properties. As children, we learn a great deal about fire safety, having drills at school and lessons at home from our parents. But many of us are in the dark when it comes to the causes of carbon monoxide poisoning and the best preventative measures to take. Read on to learn what you need to know about the silent killer to protect yourself and your family.

What produces carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide, or CO, is produced by burning fuels. Common items that emit CO gas, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, include:
  • motor vehicles
  • small engines
  • stoves
  • lanterns
  • grills
  • fireplaces
  • gas ranges
  • furnaces
We all have these items, and aside from common knowledge like not letting your car run in a closed garage, most of us don't know how to minimize risk.

Why is CO so dangerous?

Carbon monoxide, when inhaled, replaces the oxygen in our blood. If too much CO builds up in a closed room it can cause serious health problems or even death. Common symptoms from CO poisoning include:
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • confusion
  • drowsiness
  • fast breathing or heart rate
If you experience any of these symptoms indoors you should immediately leave the house. If you suspect it could be carbon monoxide exposure call 911.

Who is at Risk?

Everyone can be exposed to carbon monoxide, but some are at greater risk than others. According to Mayo Clinic, the most at-risk people for CO poisoning include:
  • Unborn babies - fetal blood cells absorb CO faster than regular blood cells, therefore unborn babies experience oxygen deprivation much more rapidly
  • Children - kids take breaths more frequently than adults, making them more susceptible to CO poisoning
  • Older adults - older people are more likely to experience brain damage from CO exposure

What preventative steps can you take?

The home is full of potential dangers when it comes to CO poisoning. Here are some of the most important steps you can take to reduce risk:
  • Buy and maintain CO detectors for your home
  • Never use your oven to heat your home
  • Never leave a vehicle or small engine running in an enclosed space such as a shed or garage
  • Do not use a charcoal grill inside
  • Do not use a gas lantern inside a tent for prolonged periods of time
  • Don't run a generator in your home or basement
  • Have your chimney checked for blockages
  • Check the ventilation on your gas appliances
  • Fire safety is also carbon monoxide safety - breathing in smoke fumes from a house fire can cause CO poisoning and death
     



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